It’s not nimbyism to question the value of fracking

There were 39 small earthquakes in the second half of October 2018 across the UK. Thirty-three of them were within a few miles of Blackpool Tower. We found out later that the company trying to frack had gotten less than 10 per cent through its planned industrial processes. As a result, the industry immediately threw its toys out of the pram and demanded the government raise the level of earthquakes it was permitted to generate from its activities.

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Technical terms in fracking consultation “misled the public” over harm from chemicals.

People have been excluded from a public consultation over fracking chemicals by the use of technical language, an industrial chemist has complained.

Dr Duncan Coppersthwaite, a member of the Royal Society of Chemistry and a chartered chemist, accused the Environment Agency, which organised the consultation, of failing to provide a fair and open process.

His complaint centres on Cuadrilla’s use of the phrase “non-hazardous” for two additives it wants to use in fracking at its Preston New Road site near Blackpool.

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Why we now need sustained public protests against fracking-Yorkshire Post

 

Clearly anti-fracking campaigners were right: UKOOG intends to industrialise the rural landscape and degrade communities on a massive 
scale. With climate breakdown already happening (record UK February temperatures, rain in February in Greenland, violent storms in southern Europe and the US), it is astonishing that corporate behemoths have the gall to push ahead with more fossil fuel extraction.

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The Grandmas Fighting Fracking One Dance Party at a Time

 

The Nanas attracted national attention in August of 2014 when they peacefully occupied the Preston New Road site, back when Cuadrilla was eyeing the field for potential gas exploration. After creeping through the hedges and climbing over the shale company’s gates at 4AM, the group asserted squatters rights under Section Six of the UK Criminal Law Act 1977. Much to Cuadrilla’s frustration, they stood their ground for three weeks.

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